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Murray
In February of 2005, Briggs & Stratton Corp. completed its purchase of the assets of Murray Inc., which manufactured lawn, garden and snow products. Wauwatosa-based Briggs (NYSE: BGG) and Murray reached an agreement for Briggs to buy most of Murray for $125 million. The sale involved the Murray name, equipment, tooling, patents, trademarks and other assets, but not Murray's real estate. As of mid 2006, no one is making Murray lawn moweres, but Briggs & Stratton plans to keep the brand alive, providing replacement parts and warranty support to more than 7,000 Murray dealers in the United States while it looks for a manufacturing partner to make new models in the future. There continues to be spot shortages of replacement parts such as pulleys, handles and cables for self-propelled lawn mowers as Briggs sorts out the assets and operations formerly managed by Murray.

4-Cycle Equipment

A basic spring service performed each year should include, at least, the following;
Check the Oil and inspect for contaminants such as water (milky), fuel (too full, thin and smells of gas) or metal particles. Contact a service tech if any are found.
Change your oil now and every 25 hours thereafter.
Sharpen blades now and every 25 hours thereafter.
Inspect air filters for dirt accumulation now, and before each usage and clean or replace. Replace air filters after 25 hours.
Inspect spark plugs every 25 hours and replace if fouled.
Grease all bearings and mechanisms requiring grease.
Inspect entire unit including all wear items such as belts, tires, control cables, bearings and other parts and watch for worn, cracked, pinched or otherwise damaged parts, and replace if found.
Drain fuel from fuel system and replace with fresh fuel if it has been over three months since last usage without fuel stabilizer. If performing and end-of-season service, drain fuel tank or run engine until it runs out of fuel. (alternatively you may dose "fresh" fuel with a fuel stabilizer)